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Quarter Of Islanders Drink To Hazardous Level

People in Jersey are drinking more than most other nations, ranking second against OECD countries for consumption.

On average, adults in Jersey drink more than the recommended 14 units of alcohol a week, with 1 in 4 drinking hazardous or harmful levels.

Despite a decline over the last 23 years, the 2022 alcohol survey suggests there is still a cause for concern.

A third of us binge drink at least once a month, and while 13% of adults are teetotal, that figure is 21% in the UK.

Professor Peter Bradley, Director of Public Health, says islanders should track how much they are drinking.

"Sometimes these things can creep up on us, and we end up drinking slightly more than we think we are, so I think that is one step that can be taken."

Around 14 units of alcohol equate to eight pints or 10 small glasses of wine.

Public Health is releasing a strategy later this year, discussing some of the policy options open to the island.

Islanders are drinking around 12 litres of pure alcohol a year on average, with two-thirds of drug and alcohol referrals being male.

There were also 765 admissions to hospital in 2021 with an alcohol-related condition, and between 2019 and 2021 there were around 30 deaths directly due to drinking.

Historically, people in Jersey are known to enjoy a drink more than our neighbours, but Professor Bradley says the problem is more serious than just 'Jersey culture'.

"Young people are drinking less and less, so there's more to it than that.

What we see at the moment is people who drink very little, increasing numbers of people who don't drink at all and those who are drinking to a more excessive level.

It seems to be a big difference between groups of people on the island so I think it is a little bit more complicated than it just being Jersey.

The number of 16 to 34-year-olds that are teetotal has doubled between 2014 and 2022.

The trend of young islanders drinking less has also been observed in the UK, but professionals are not sure why it has come around.

Some theories include the increase in digital hobbies which may not allow younger generations time to drink whilst playing games, or they are simply distracted.

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